Kozchive

chadwys:

Assorted work by Chad Wys (web/tumblr/fb)

  • Opus 2 (Arrangement In Skintones), digital chromogenic print, 2012
  • Castrophia, paint on laser print, 2012
  • The Girl With Stars In Her Eyes, paint on found ceramic bust, 2014
  • Garage Sale Painting Of Peasants With Color Bars, paint on found painting and frame, 2011
  • Portrait Of A Woman With Deletions, paint on found print, 2010
  • Nocturne 109, digital chromogenic print, 2011
  • Thrift Store Landscape With A Color Test, paint on found canvas and frame, 2009
  • A Grecian Bust With Color Tests, paint on found stone sculpture, 2013
  • Brutalized Gainsborough 2, paint on laser print, 2009
  • Hymn 32, digital chromogenic print, 2013

http://chadwys.com/index.html

high-visibility:

Claire Bushby’s artwork all folded & ready to go!  Screen print by Danni McGrath.

high-visibility:

Claire Bushby’s artwork all folded & ready to go!
Screen print by Danni McGrath.

hyperallergic:

(via A San Francisco School with an Artistic Mission)
The most telling artifact in Energy That Is All Around is a letter artist Alicia McCathy received from her school, the San Francisco Art Institute (SFAI), back in 1992. In it, the dean of students chastises her for campus graffiti, which he says “looks like shit,” and goes on to explain:
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hyperallergic:

(via A San Francisco School with an Artistic Mission)

The most telling artifact in Energy That Is All Around is a letter artist Alicia McCathy received from her school, the San Francisco Art Institute (SFAI), back in 1992. In it, the dean of students chastises her for campus graffiti, which he says “looks like shit,” and goes on to explain:

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"If something looks wrong there is probably something wrong."

believermag:

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River Valley—from Transfigurations (32”x40” Gelatin Silver Print)

Bucky Miller in Conversation with Photographer Michael Lundgren

In Michael Lundgren’s kitchen there is something called the cabinet of death. It houses mostly artifacts that the photographer collects in the deserts of the Southwestern United States and Northern Mexico, but among the expected seed pods, mammal skulls, and dried-out lizards are some dusty, mysterious bits of technological evidence. The most memorable of these is a half-melted and charred orange pill bottle that has fused to the digital camera memory card it contained, creating a reliquary for something unknowable but entirely relatable.

The cabinet is a reasonable parallel to Lundgren’s picture-making. His first book, Transfigurations (Radius, 2008) was akin to a Sonoran landscape survey performed by a magical realist. The work he’s made since, which he calls Matter, is a bit different. The landscape has remained the same, but Mike’s relationship to it has evolved.  A selection of those pictures are on view at Fraenkel Gallery in San Francisco as part of the exhibition Where There’s Smoke from July 10—August 23. On a recent and unexpected drive through the Arizona desert Mike and I started talking about the shift in his picture making and I started recording.

—Bucky Miller

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Untitled—from Transfigurations (20” x 24” Gelatin Silver Print)

I. LOOK AT IT

THE BELIEVER: Your first book really was entrenched in the history of landscape photography, and I think the new work is less tied to the generation of photographers who influenced you. It deals with landscape in a way we aren’t used to seeing.

MICHAEL LUNDGREN: Exactly. The older work, I’ve been noticing more and more now looking at it, was really my way of digesting history, tracing the path of history in terms of photography in general, and specifically landscape photography. It charts the path of my understanding of my predecessors. It’s much less mine, even though I had thought it was mine at the time.

The new work has much less precedent, and the precedent is not in landscape photography. Even though it’s connected to the landscape, the precedent is in work that’s maybe only become possible because of the pictures generation.

BLVR: Like what?

ML: The idea that photographs come from other places. The idea that a valid art photograph does not just come from the solo artist with a vision, but that one can glean things from contemporary culture, from the vernacular, from advertising. That generation changed the way we see pictures. Larry Sultan and Mike Mandel are probably the largest, most obvious influence.

BLVR: Evidence.

ML: Yeah. They are the biggest influence in the known world. In the unknown world, which is where the best work is, other artists are important.

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ccteakell:

ccteakell.tumblr.com

ccteakell:

ccteakell.tumblr.com

bigink:

The newest BIG INKers KILLED IT!  10 artists where chosen out of an application pool of 24 and had two months to work on a large woodcut at least 24” x 36” in dimension. We all met and I helped them print their work on June 15th/16th at Zea Mays Printmaking in Florence, MA.

If you would like to be notified of the next open call for entry follow me on Tumblr or go to www.lyellcastonguay.com/apply for more information. I am in the process of scheduling another BIG INK for this fall!

it would be nice

natalyabalnova:

Animals in Daze #2

3-color silkscreen prints
10” x 12”, edition of 15